Finding Love at 70 Plus Years Old

Finding Love at 70 Plus Years Old

Finding Love Again at 70 Plus Years OldLast week we had 24 new residents at our new resident reception. Out of 24 new senior residents:

  • Two senior couples had met online.
  • One senior couple had met by each placing an ad in the local paper.

Wow!  How exciting is that? Seniors are finding love after losing a spouse of 30 or 40 years.

One of these couples met through E-harmony. We had dinner together and they shared their exciting journey. They each filled out a lengthy questionnaire to find the perfect mate. Each was looking for someone who loved to travel. The gentleman rejected a potential date with a senior who only loved cruising, another lady only wanted to travel to Europe and a third potential senior woman was a retired stewardess.

This senior man was patiently waiting for a senior woman who wanted to travel by RV or motorhome around the country. After finding that potential senior woman online, they only corresponded through the dating website for next three months. Then they exchanged emails and phone numbers. They both proceeded cautiously.

Well their relationship bloomed into marriage and traveling the country by RV for four years. You can see a glow on each of their faces when they speak of the other.

They decided to settle at The Village in Hemet, CA. They wanted to create a plan for their future and not be a burden to their families in a health care crisis. They are trying every community activity together, such as exercising in the health club, enjoying live performances and swimming three days a week. Both of them love life and are enthusiastic about meeting all the other friendly residents at dinner.

Another senior couple who met at this same Continuing Care Retirement Community created an exciting stir at the monthly cocktail party.  He asked her if she would be his life partner in front of everyone.  She asked all the residents attending, “What should I say?”  The residents all responded, “Say yes!”  They are now a happy couple!

Do you have any stories of seniors age 70 plus who have found love again?

Your Senior Housing Options,” has a simplistic title, but what’s inside this new book can save a you months of research time.  Hear Diane Masson’s interview of how her mother and in-law’s faced the pivotal decision to plan ahead or wait until a crisis.  Learn the pitfalls from transitioning from your home to senior housing.  Understand what questions to ask, insider tips and dirty secrets revealed.  The decision to stay home requires caregivers.  Prevent elder abuse by determining if a home care agency is reputable, before they move into your home.  You are just not looking for today’s needs, but for your future care.  Discover key differences between rental facilities vs Continuing Care Retirement Communities.  Do you have enough financial resources if you need to be in a higher level of care for an extended period of time?  For weekly tips join at: Www.Tips2Seniors.com 

Diane Masson has worked in senior housing for 17 years and is the regional marketing director for two debt-free Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Southern CA (Freedom Village in Lake Forest and The Village in Hemet).  Her first book “Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” is being utilized by senior housing professionals across the country.  Both her first book and second book, “Your Senior Housing Options,” have a 5-star rating on Amazon.com.

Flu – Better at Home or Senior Community?

Flu – Better at Home or Senior Community?

Flu Remedies at Home or Senior CommunityIt’s flu season and I unfortunately succumbed with a 100.8 temperature reading and a horrible cough. My husband, Chris, was sicker than I. As we nursed each other back to health, I thought about single seniors trying to manage flu symptoms alone in their home.

What if a senior didn’t have enough groceries stocked at home? What if they were too weak to even make themselves a can of soup? Would they monitor their own temperature and take Tylenol every six hours?   What about drinking enough liquids? Will anyone check on his or her well-being?

The flu has not struck at the Continuing Care Retirement Communities that I represent. It makes me feel good to know if one of our residents got the flu, in the independent living setting, room service could bring them a meal of soup, fruit and tea or what they need to start healing. If a senior resident wondered if they need to be hospitalized they could walk down the hall to the complimentary wellness clinic and ask the nurse. If they were really bad the senior resident could pull their emergency cord and a nurse or emergency medical technician would come help them. Wow! I did not have that luxury. Frankly, I could have used it Friday night when I considered going to the emergency room, because it was getting hard to breathe.

Assisted living and skilled nursing support residents 24-hours a day, so if a senior got the flu, they have caregivers who can nourish them back to health.

Some critics might say that a community setting promotes the spread of flu, with all those people living and dining together. There are small steps senior living communities can do to reduce this challenge. First and foremost, install hand sanitizer in strategic places in the community, such as the lobby and dining room entrances.  Second, promoting flu shots.  Plus if people are sick, such as myself, they just need to stay at home to reduce the spread of infection.

What are your thoughts? Is it better to have the flu isolated in your home or in a senior living community?

With experience as both an industry expert and a loving daughter, Diane Twohy Masson is passionate about helping seniors find the retirement community that fits their price range, lifestyle, and needs. Her new guidebook offers a proactive approach to navigating the complex maze of senior housing options. It will help you understand the costs and consequences of the various possibilities, from home care to independent living, assisted living, group homes, memory care, and skilled nursing-care facilities.

“Your Senior Housing Options,” will be coming soon to Amazon.com. If you sign up for my weekly newsletter on the right side of this blog, you will be notified when my new book becomes available. Check out my new website: Tips2Seniors.com or please follow me on Facebook.

Diane Twohy Masson is the author of “Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” available at Amazon.com with a 5-star rating.  The book is required reading at George Mason University as a part of its marketing curriculum.  Within this book, the author developed a sales & marketing method with 12 keys to help senior living providers increase their occupancy.

Can You Miss One Long-term Care Payment?

Can You Miss One Long-term Care Payment?

Long-term Care InsuranceYesterday, I learned of a senior resident in California who was denied HER long-term care coverage in skilled nursing, because she had missed one payment while ill.  Are you seriously kidding me?  This is flat out wrong and it makes me angry.  I have been in the senior living industry for fifteen years and always considered those with long-term insurance fortunate.

Now I realize that when a senior is most vulnerable is also when they need this coverage to kick in.  Who will fill out the paperwork?  All the Continuing Care Retirement Communities where I work graciously accommodate residents in this area.  But what about missing a payment to the long term care insurance company?  This seems bound to happen.

According the Alzheimer’s Association one in three seniors die of dementia, so it would make sense that a senior with dementia or Alzheimer’s might miss a bill or two.  So all those years of paying in for a higher level of care are negated when you are sick and demented?  Come on, this is not acceptable.

Long-term care insurance is a security blanket to offset the high cost of future health care as you age.  Many seniors have paid in for years to either have a policy that provides up to a certain dollar amount or certain time range (typically three years).

The senior and her family are all panicked.  The son made numerous attempts to call his mom’s insurance company and would remain on hold for over forty minutes.  Unbelievably, after he finally reached them thirty days later, the policy had expired two days before for lack of payment.  If someone has been paying for long-term care insurance for years, you should not be penalized when you are sick and need the care the most.  The family is appealing.

Has anyone else heard of this happening?  Is this normal?  Do you think it is okay?

Please consider joining this exclusive Marketing2Seniors blog and comment below to join the conversation and interact with other senior living professionals on what is currently being effective to increase occupancy on a nationwide basis.

Diane Twohy Masson is currently writing a new book for seniors on how to select senior housing options.  Her first book, “Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” is available at Amazon.com with a five star rating.  Masson continues to set move in records as the regional marketing director of two debt-free Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Southern California – Freedom Village in Lake Forest and The Village in Hemet, California.  Her mom’s struggle with dementia is inspiring Diane to pen a third book to support adult children.

 

© Marketing 2 Seniors| Diane Twohy Masson 2014 All Rights Reserved. No part of this blog post may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials. You may share this website and or it’s content by any of the following means: 1. Using any of the share icons at the bottom of each page. 2. Providing a back-link or the URL of the content you wish to disseminate. 3. You may quote extracts from the website with attribution to Diane Masson CASP and link http://www.marketing2seniors.net For any other mode of sharing, please contact the author Diane Masson.
Moving A Lifetime of Memories (Part 2)

Moving A Lifetime of Memories (Part 2)

They Moved And Placed Everything Except The Cat!

They Moved And Placed Everything Except The Cat!

Easiest move ever?  Yes!!!  It was a picture perfect move thanks to a senior friendly company called Helping Hands in California.  They literally pulled out their smart phones and snapped “before pictures.”  Then in the new home each mover referenced their smart phones to recreate a room, a bookcase or any area that had knick-knacks.  Moving a Lifetime of Memories (Part 1) is about my decision to hire a senior moving company.

An army of men arrived at 9:00 AM and the move went so fast.  The same person that packed up the kitchen unpacked and organized the kitchen in our new home.  This one fact alone was awesome and took tremendous stress off of me.  The same mover that packed up the bathroom reorganized it in the new bathroom.  It was amazing.

Here is the completion level of each room on the day of the move:

  • The kitchen is 100% done (just need to buy groceries and we are ready to cook).
  • Living room is 100% done (including pictures on the wall).
  • Dining room is 100% done (including pictures on the wall).
  • The master bath is 100% done (everything is in it’s place).
  • Office/music room is 95% done (books on the book shelves, pictures hung and still need to rightsize the closets a bit more).
  • Coat and towel closet are 100% done.
  • Master bedroom is 90% done (still need to reorganize the clothes hanging in the closet, buy two lamps and figure out what pictures to hang).
  • Second bathroom is 0% done (only two boxes to unpack, because our two cats were crated in this room during the move).
  • The garage is 50% done (all the garage stuff is in the garage, but we could not have the team of men put everything away because the garage was too dirty).

Our biggest move challenges?

  • Downsizing in general, so I focused on rightsizing.  It was easier to stomach rightsizing.  It is an attitude.
  • Arriving the day of the move to find a dirty garage with stuff left from the previous owner.
  • Realizing our master bedroom has zero light.

The good news is that I loved Helping Hands, because instead of months to settle into my home, I am already settled.  It should just take a couple of days to go buy lamps and then clean and organize the garage.

I highly recommend this senior moving company and this type of service for seniors moving into retirement communities.  Yes, it does cost more than two man and a truck, but it can literally take the stress away from moving.

Please share your successes, failures or comment below to join the conversation and interact with other senior living professionals on what is currently being effective to increase occupancy on a nationwide basis.

Diane Twohy Masson is the author of “Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” available at Amazon.com with a 5-star rating.  The book is required reading at George Mason University as a part of its marketing curriculum.  Within this book, the author developed a sales & marketing method with 12 keys to help senior living providers increase their occupancy.   Masson developed this expertise as a marketing consultant, sought-after blogger for senior housing and a regional marketing director of continuing care retirement communities in several markets.  She has also been a corporate director of sales and a mystery shopper for independent living, assisted living, memory care and skilled care nursing communities in multiple states.  Currently, Masson is setting move-in records as the regional marketing director of two debt-free Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Southern California – Freedom Village in Lake Forest and The Village in Hemet, California.  Interestingly, this career started when she was looking for a place for her own mom and helped her loved one transition through three levels of care.

© Marketing 2 Seniors| Diane Twohy Masson 2013 All Rights Reserved. No part of this blog post may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials. You may share this website and or it’s content by any of the following means: 1. Using any of the share icons at the bottom of each page. 2. Providing a back-link or the URL of the content you wish to disseminate. 3. You may quote extracts from the website with attribution to Diane Masson CASP and link http://www.marketing2seniors.net For any other mode of sharing, please contact the author Diane Masson.
Showing Un-Renovated Apartments?  Bad Idea!!!!!

Showing Un-Renovated Apartments? Bad Idea!!!!!

Un-Renovated Senior Living Apartments This picture is worth a thousand words.  What is the state of your available apartments?  On a recent trip to Oregon, the best place in town had this in the tub.  I wanted to throw up.  Really?  Yet, I have seen this and worse when mystery shopping senior living communities.

Your maintenance team is overworked and they don’t have time to do apartment renovations.  So many senior residents are moving out…maintenance can’t keep up.  So senior living sales people have to show apartments that are not clean or renovated.  Is this fine at your retirement community?  Non-renovated apartments have sold that way before, right?

Wrong?!!!  This is a poor long-term strategy and bad first impression to fill the building and increase occupancy.  Don’t listen to the maintenance team blues!  Here are four quick solutions if your retirement community is in this boat…

  1. Only show model apartments period.  Never ever show a disgusting apartment that someone just moved out of.  It is not available to show ever!!!!
  2. If you don’t have model apartments, make arrangements with a few residents to show their apartments.  It’s always nice to have one or two residents who say you may show their apartment anytime.
  3. Have housekeeping clean up the disgusting apartment now, before it is shown to single a person.  (I know this is double work for housekeeping, cleaning it before and after renovation.  The extra clean does help sell apartments and improves first impressions.)
  4. The fourth choice is to pay an outside company to renovate apartments at your senior living community.  I know it costs more money than doing it in-house.  Please look at it in a new way…every month that an apartment remains empty, the senior living organization loses $2,000 to $6,000 in a monthly fee.

Please give sales and marketing the tools they need to create great first impressions and sell it now.  Showing models works great for a senior just looking or thinking two or three months out.  If you want those 48-hour move-ins or two-week move-ins, then clean up the apartments that need to be sold now.  

Please share your successes, failures or comment below to join the conversation and interact with other senior living professionals on what is currently being effective to increase occupancy on a nationwide basis.

Diane Twohy Masson is the author of “Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” available at Amazon.com with a 5-star rating.  The book is required reading at George Mason University as a part of its marketing curriculum.  Within this book, the author developed a sales & marketing method with 12 keys to help senior living providers increase their occupancy.   Masson developed this expertise as a marketing consultant, sought-after blogger for senior housing and a regional marketing director of continuing care retirement communities in several markets.  She has also been a corporate director of sales and a mystery shopper for independent living, assisted living, memory care and skilled care nursing communities in multiple states.  Currently, Masson is setting move-in records as the regional marketing director of two debt-free Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Southern California – Freedom Village in Lake Forest and The Village in Hemet, California.  Interestingly, this career started when she was looking for a place for her own mom and helped her loved one transition through three levels of care.

© Marketing 2 Seniors| Diane Twohy Masson 2013 All Rights Reserved. No part of this blog post may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials. You may share this website and or it’s content by any of the following means: 1. Using any of the share icons at the bottom of each page. 2. Providing a back-link or the URL of the content you wish to disseminate. 3. You may quote extracts from the website with attribution to Diane Masson CASP and link http://www.marketing2seniors.net For any other mode of sharing, please contact the author Diane Masson.
Do Your Senior Living Residents Support Marketing?

Do Your Senior Living Residents Support Marketing?

Do Your Senior Living Residents Support Marketing?Please share in the comment section below – how your residents either support or sabotage the marketing efforts of your senior living community.

Are you embarrassed to introduce some of your residents on a tour?  Why?

Do you fear what some of your residents might tell prospective senior residents?  Why?

Here is a 5-Step Program to on-board your residents through communication:

  1. Dine with key residents to gain their buy-in for marketing.
    1. Listen to their stories and build relationships with residents.
    2. Create goodwill that will spread through the rest of the community.
  2. Speak at the next resident council meeting.
    1. Share how important residents are to the marketing effort.
    2. Explain how they can help encourage guests to become residents.
    3. Teach them the right language to use – such as “community,” not “facility.”  Please don’t say, “Do you want to become an inmate in this institution.” (This has seriously happened to me.)
  3. Write an article for the next resident newsletter.
    1. Have a different theme every month – such as refer your friends and receive $500 on your next monthly bill or thanking them for dining with new residents.
    2. Praise supportive residents and how they helped marketing.
  4. Create a memo about your next event and post it through your in-house mail system.
    1. Residents like to know who and why someone is coming to their home.
    2. Invite them to attend the event, if they bring a prospective resident.
    3. Apologize to them, if there is not enough room for residents to participate.
  5. Start a resident contest for a testimonial – on why they enjoy living at the community.
    1. Generate positive energy.
    2. Share the top five answers at the next resident council meeting or in your next monthly article.

Communicate with your current residents.  They love to be in the know.  Hopefully you are blessed with great residents who support all the marketing efforts, programs and events.  I love the residents that I work with – they are the best – how about yours?

Please share your success, failures or comment below to join the conversation and interact with other senior living professionals on what is currently being effective to increase occupancy on a nationwide basis.

Diane Twohy Masson is the author of “Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” available at Amazon.com with a 5-star rating.  The book is required reading at George Mason University as a part of its marketing curriculum.  Within this book, the author developed a sales & marketing method with 12 keys to help senior living providers increase their occupancy.   Masson developed this expertise as a marketing consultant, sought-after blogger for senior housing and a regional marketing director of continuing care retirement communities in several markets.  She has also been a corporate director of sales and a mystery shopper for independent living, assisted living, memory care and skilled care nursing communities in multiple states.  Most recently Masson was recruited to consult for two debt-free Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Southern California – Freedom Village in Lake Forest and The Village in Hemet, California.  Interestingly, this career started when she was looking for a place for her own mom and helped her loved one transition through three levels of care.

© Marketing 2 Seniors| Diane Twohy Masson 2013 All Rights Reserved. No part of this blog post may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials. You may share this website and or it’s content by any of the following means: 1. Using any of the share icons at the bottom of each page. 2. Providing a back-link or the URL of the content you wish to disseminate. 3. You may quote extracts from the website with attribution to Diane Masson CASP and link http://www.marketing2seniors.net For any other mode of sharing, please contact the author Diane Masson.