Discarding Great Leads?

Discarding Great Leads?

Discarding Great Leads?

Discarding Great Leads?

There are thousands of senior living sales people across this country.  After each tour, they have choice to pursue a viable lead or simply ignore it.  Is your frontline sales staff making the right decision?  Do you review new inquiry leads with them?

If not, why not?!!?  It costs your senior living organization thousands of dollars to bring in new call-in leads and walk-in tours.  Just this last week, I know of two sales people who each blew off a lead because it was not quick move-in.  Luckily I caught them in time, so that follow up phone calls could happen.

One prospective resident couple had a complicated situation with a wife who wanted independent living with a husband who was qualified for skilled nursing care.  They wanted to bring in their own caregiver and the man could not feed himself.  The sales person felt it was too complicated to pursue.

I shared a story of a couple that came to my Continuing Care Retirement Community several years ago.  The man was dying and the couple wanted to move to independent living together.  My executive director said no, it was too hard on the other residents and he was not independent.  In spite of this decision, I loved on this couple.  Five months later, the husband died.  I sent sympathy card.   The wife appreciated me reaching out with caring kindness.  Within weeks, she moved into my retirement community.

So when the senior living sales person called back this complicated prospective resident couple, he learned that the husband was in the hospital.  He loved on the wife as I had suggested.  I expect a move in the next six months from this additional phone encounter.

Do you have stories of difficult tours turning into sales?

Please consider joining this exclusive Marketing2Seniors blog and comment below to join the conversation and interact with other senior living professionals on what is currently being effective to increase occupancy on a nationwide basis.

Diane Twohy Masson is currently writing a new book for seniors on how to select senior housing options.  Her first book, “Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” is available at Amazon.com with a five star rating.  Masson continues to set move in records as the regional marketing director of two debt-free Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Southern California – Freedom Village in Lake Forest and The Village in Hemet, California.  Her mom’s struggle with dementia is inspiring Diane to pen a third book to support adult children.

© Marketing 2 Seniors| Diane Twohy Masson 2014 All Rights Reserved. No part of this blog post may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials. You may share this website and or it’s content by any of the following means: 1. Using any of the share icons at the bottom of each page. 2. Providing a back-link or the URL of the content you wish to disseminate. 3. You may quote extracts from the website with attribution to Diane Masson CASP and link http://www.marketing2seniors.net For any other mode of sharing, please contact the author Diane Masson.
Where is Your Attitude Meter Today?

Where is Your Attitude Meter Today?

Attitude Meter in Senior LivingYour attitude meter can subconsciously be affecting your sales performance.  If I gave the same 10 leads to three senior living sales people with different types of attitudes, the sale results would vary widely.  See where your attitude falls today.

Poor Attitude

  1. “Oh no, another walk in, I am so busy.”
  2.  Complains, “Everyone is simply not ready yet.”
  3. Very low repeat tours.
  4. Major thoughts – I’m tired, the leads are terrible and the sales goals are too high.
  5. Dreads follow up phone calls and people saying “No.”
  6. Believes the senior prospect when they say, “I am not ready yet.”
  7. Cares mostly about themselves.

Average Attitude

  1. Takes a few minutes to gear up to go meet the walk-in tour.
  2. “I have a few good prospects, some are not ready yet.”
  3. A few repeat tours per week.
  4. Major thoughts – I can do this, there are some good leads, I want to hit the sales goals.
  5. Some days feel great doing follow up phone calls and other days are a struggle.
  6. Believes the senior prospect 70% of the time when they say, “I am not ready yet.”
  7. Cares equally about the prospect and themselves.

Great Attitude

  1. Excited to greet the walk-in tour within moments of arrival.
  2. Continually plans strategies to turn warm and hot leads into move-ins.
  3. Lots of repeat tours.
  4. Major thoughts – I am excited, the leads are great, I can exceed the sales goals.
  5. Has enthusiasm in their voice as they eagerly make follow up phone calls.
  6. When a senior prospect says, “I am not ready yet,” they know the prospect is scared, but close to a transition.  Believes they will move forward in the near future.
  7. Cares mostly about the senior prospect and helping them find a solution for their needs.

Where do you and your senior living team members fall on the attitude meter?  What else can you add to differentiate the three attitudes?

Please share your successes, failures or comment below to join the conversation and interact with other senior living professionals on what is currently being effective to increase occupancy on a nationwide basis.

Diane Twohy Masson is the author of “Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” available at Amazon.com with a 5-star rating.  The book is required reading at George Mason University as a part of its marketing curriculum.  Within this book, the author developed a sales & marketing method with 12 keys to help senior living providers increase their occupancy.   Masson developed this expertise as a marketing consultant, sought-after blogger for senior housing and a regional marketing director of continuing care retirement communities in several markets.  She has also been a corporate director of sales and a mystery shopper for independent living, assisted living, memory care and skilled care nursing communities in multiple states.  Currently, Masson is setting move-in records as the regional marketing director of two debt-free Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Southern California – Freedom Village in Lake Forest and The Village in Hemet, California.  Interestingly, this career started when she was looking for a place for her own mom and helped her loved one transition through three levels of care.

© Marketing 2 Seniors| Diane Twohy Masson 2014 All Rights Reserved. No part of this blog post may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials. You may share this website and or it’s content by any of the following means: 1. Using any of the share icons at the bottom of each page. 2. Providing a back-link or the URL of the content you wish to disseminate. 3. You may quote extracts from the website with attribution to Diane Masson CASP and link http://www.marketing2seniors.net For any other mode of sharing, please contact the author Diane Masson.
How Many Calls Does Your Senior Living Team Make Per Month (part 2)?

How Many Calls Does Your Senior Living Team Make Per Month (part 2)?

How Many Calls Does Your Senior Living Team Make Per Month (part 2)?There were such a variety of responses to “How Many Calls Does Your Senior Living Team Make Per Month,” I am choosing to expound with a more in-depth part 2.  Senior living sale professionals responded with call requirements from 20 calls an hour to 40 completed calls per week.  Someone else’s retirement community had mandated 53 connected calls per month.

Here is one response:

“Diane, I have enjoyed reading your blogs on seniors, which are informative with best practices.  This one on “How Many Calls A Month” made us gasp with the large number of calls a sales team is expected to make nowadays.  500 to 1,000+ calls a month must be only cold calling behind a closed door and doing nothing else like sales events, tours, refurbishment oversight, building relationships with future residents, community and church relations, follow up on leads and inquiries, application process, and administrative team projects.”  Nancy

My response: These calls were not cold calls, so here is a more detailed explanation.

My example in part one had a marketing director with 469 calls and her two team mates with 340 and 315 calls respectively.  These sales calls included: call-ins, voice-to-voice call-outs and left messages.  I believe if someone leaves a great message, seniors will call back.  Our requirement is 75 calls a week or 300 per month.  This is not one isolated goal.  Another goal is 20 initial or repeat tours per month.  This tour goal does not include post-closing appointments after a deposit has been taken.

Yes, these senior living sales people have other responsibilities including three events per month (all day), responding to Internet inquiries, weekly strategy meetings, book reviews, overseeing apartment renovations for their clients, and managing his or her move-ins (paperwork, relationship building, setting up health assessments, family tours and etc.).

If you don’t have sales and occupancy goals, then no one has a pinnacle to reach.  This team produced five Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) sales in the last eight days.  They have hit the quarterly move-in goals this year and are currently close to hitting the fourth quarter goal and going to Disneyland.  This year, they have produced the most CCRC move-ins at their retirement community since 2005.

Please share your call, tour and move-in quotas to converse with other senior living sales professionals.  Let’s hear about the variety of quotas out there.  It will also be interesting to know if you are hitting your move-in goals based on your calling goals.

Please share your success, failures or comment below to join the conversation and interact with other senior living professionals on what is currently being effective to increase occupancy on a nationwide basis.

Diane Twohy Masson is the author of “Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” available at Amazon.com with a 5-star rating.  The book is required reading at George Mason University as a part of its marketing curriculum.  Within this book, the author developed a sales & marketing method with 12 keys to help senior living providers increase their occupancy.   Masson developed this expertise as a marketing consultant, sought-after blogger for senior housing and a regional marketing director of continuing care retirement communities in several markets.  She has also been a corporate director of sales and a mystery shopper for independent living, assisted living, memory care and skilled care nursing communities in multiple states.  Most recently Masson was recruited to consult for two debt-free Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Southern California – Freedom Village in Lake Forest and The Village in Hemet, California.  Interestingly, this career started when she was looking for a place for her own mom and helped her loved one transition through three levels of care.

© Marketing 2 Seniors| Diane Twohy Masson 2013 All Rights Reserved. No part of this blog post may be reproduced, copied, modified or adapted, without the prior written consent of the author, unless otherwise indicated for stand-alone materials. You may share this website and or it’s content by any of the following means: 1. Using any of the share icons at the bottom of each page. 2. Providing a back-link or the URL of the content you wish to disseminate. 3. You may quote extracts from the website with attribution to Diane Masson CASP and link http://www.marketing2seniors.net For any other mode of sharing, please contact the author Diane Masson.
13 Quick Tips to Increase the Occupancy by 3%!

13 Quick Tips to Increase the Occupancy by 3%!

  1. 13 Quick Tips in Senior LivingFocus on personal and team occupancy goals (visualize success).
  2. Expect the entire senior living sales team to have a good attitude.
  3. Treat every initial lead as hot until they cool off.
  4. Listen to prospective residents and solve their problems.
  5. Don’t listen when they say, “I am not ready yet.”
  6. Give a wow tour!
  7. Introduce prospective residents to multiple residents and staff.
  8. Always inquire about a senior’s timeline on making a move.
  9. Ask for the deposit – every time.
  10. Have fun.
  11. Represent a beautiful and clean retirement community.
  12. Call potential senior residents or their boomer children the next day after the tour.
  13. The sales team needs to believe and treat every walk-in or Internet lead as though they are ready to move in now!

Please share your success, failures or comment to join the conversation and interact with other senior living professionals on what is currently being effective to increase occupancy on a nationwide basis.

Diane Twohy Masson is the author of Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” available for sale at Amazon.com.  Masson’s book will be required reading at George Mason University in the Fall as part of the marketing curriculum.  She is currently consulting with two debt-free Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Southern California – Freedom Village in Lake Forest and The Village in Hemet, California. Connection and partnership opportunities: Email: diane@marketing2seniors.net

No hot leads?  Seriously?!!?

No hot leads? Seriously?!!?

Hot LeadsAre hot leads attitude or reality?  I say attitude!  Some senior living sales people expect a prospective resident to walk in and say, “I have my house on the market and I’m ready to move into your retirement community.”  How often does this happen?  It could happen 20% of the time.  This means 80% of the time, a sales person needs to build a relationship, document it in the database and do the dreaded follow up phone calls.  Oh yeah, it’s called work.  If it was easy selling senior living, retirement counselors would be paid minimum wage.

With proper nurturing, over time, a cool lead can become warm and a warm lead can become hot!

Too many senior living sales people say they don’t have any hot leads.  Yet, if you were a little mouse on their shoulder, while they met with a senior….  This is what you might hear the prospective senior resident say, “I’m not ready yet (NRY).”

In sales they say, don’t listen to the first no.  Well I say, don’t listen to the first 10 NRY!  The senior can still be a hot lead (ready to move in a few months)!

NRY simply translated means I am scared.   It’s hard for a senior to give up their home of 30, 40 or 50 years and move.  It’s a lot of work.  The more time they spend at your retirement community the better.  They will fall in love with your residents.  Then the senior can decide they will gain more by moving into your retirement community, than what they are giving up.

The mindset of the sales person dictates how many hot leads they have.    Believe – truly believe the seniors are ready to move in sooner than what the prospective resident actually says to you.  Typically just cut the time frame a senior says in half.

Please share your success, failures or comment to join the conversation and interact with other senior living professionals on what is currently being effective to increase occupancy on a nationwide basis.

Diane Twohy Masson is the author of Senior Housing Marketing – How to Increase Your Occupancy and Stay Full,” available for sale at Amazon.com.  Masson’s book will be required reading at George Mason University in the Fall as part of the marketing curriculum.  She is currently consulting with Seniors For Living and two debt-free Continuing Care Retirement Communities in Southern California – Freedom Village in Lake Forest and The Village in Hemet, California. Connection and partnership opportunities: Email: diane@marketing2seniors.net